» Moving to Ubuntu

It’s nothing against my Mac mini or OS X but the time finally came for me to move my site to another box and operating system. I was having some strange MySQL issues following the upgrade to 10.5.8 on the mini. I also wanted to install 10.6 on the mini and was dreading the act of tracking down the strange nuances that I’m sure would be introduced.

I did a fairly standard install of Ubuntu Server 9.04 on a 2.8Ghz P4 with 1.0GB of RAM. The only optional software I selected was the LAMP option (Apache, MySQL, and PHP) and the SSH option. Getting everything working was pretty simple, the WordPress install itself was a cinch. I also did the standard export/import of all my posts. The last thing I did was drop in my old wp-content folder because I have my theme and some other custom images in there as well as my plugins.

After it was all said and done the only thing I had a little trouble with was getting pretty permalinks working again. As you’ll recall, I’ve covered this topic in the past. The process is essentially the same with a few marked differences that required some research.

First, to enable Apache’s rewrite module, you have to create a symbolic link as below rather than updating httpd.conf. In newer versions of Apache, many of the settings/configurations are pulled out of httpd.conf because the file was getting increasingly large.

cd /etc/apache2/mods-enabled
ln -s ../mods-available/rewrite.load ./rewrite.conf

The other step that is different is enabling the AllowOverride directive. With Ubuntu Server’s implementation of Apache2 you have to navigate to /etc/apache2/sites-available and edit the file default as below (thanks):

Options Indexes FollowSymLinks MultiViews
AllowOverride All
Order allow,deny
allow from all

» The 50mm prime lens

Great article over at DPS on the benefits of prime lenses and more specifically, the “nifty fifty.”

But, it is for a fact that the best optical quality is delivered by prime lenses … because they use a smaller number of glass elements inside the lens, which means lesser loss of quality, and hence better pictures.

I personally prefer the 35mm prime for my Nikon’s DX sensor — while more expensive, it is a more true 50mm replacement. Using a 50mm prime on a DX sensor is the equivalent of using a 75mm lens on film. For my taste that limits the lens just a little too much.

A few choice photos taken with my 35mm:

@.